Letters of 1916: Visualising 16 Topics

At first I generated 16 topics (the reason is explained in a previous post) with Gensim and Mallet. When I visualised my data with Gephi I got an interesting result.

Mallet – 16 topics

letters_T16_01_lab

Gensim – 16 topics

letters_gensim_T16_01_lab

The Mallet output shows clearly a clustering of human assigned topics (colors) around computer generated topics (the black nodes, numbered Topic 0 – 15). At least letters assigned to four topics seem to cluster also together based on computer generated topics: Letters categorised as World War 1, Family life, Official documents and Love letters. See for instance, the clustering of letters assigned to the category of WW1 and Family life. It seems that the language of letters with these two categories are quite close:

topic5_mallet_16T

The above mentioned categories cluster quite nicely. Another observation is that the green nodes for the categories Easter Rising and Irish question are all over the place and it is questionable if this is a useful category. The remaining categories are not used much at the moment, and they are not really visible. However, they could get more important when the data set grows.

The visualisation of the Gensim topics is not so clear at first glance, because there are many more edges. But a similar red, blue and yellow clustering can be observed. One issue with the Gensim algorithm was however that it responded much more to address information in the letters, and this influences the topic modelling process. This can be observed when looking at the generated topics, the clustering of the letters and the transcriptions of the individual letters. Address information is currently part of the transcription. The plan for the future it to encode the letters in TEI. When they are TEI encoded the stripping out of address information, salutation, etc. will be easier and much clearer topics can be generated.

 

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One thought on “Letters of 1916: Visualising 16 Topics

  1. Pingback: Richard Hadden

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