Category Archives: Learning

The Humanities Programmer

Following a comment by Alex O’Connor I pushed all my code up on GitHub. I had planned to do this at some stage, but it never crossed my mind that somebody would be interested to study how I am writing the code for this project. On closer thinking about it, it is actually a fascinating topic.  More and more humanities research with no or little CS background learn programming languages in order to have another tool in their toolbox for text processing, online publishing, etc.

The interest in and use of programming languages by Humanities scholars goes way back into the 1960 and 1970s when collation concordances and collation software was developed. The use of this software required at least some knowledge of a programming language. From 1966 on a number of articles about programming languages for humanities research appeared in the journal Computers and the Humanities. The ability of a language to allow the Humanities Scholar ‘to split, scan, measure, compare, and join strings’ were essential, but also tasks like text formatting required programming knowledge at that time. The article also emphasizes that in the future programming languages for “complex pattern-matching problems that arise in musical or graphic art analysis” will become important too. A 1971 article in the same journal gives an overview over languages ‘easy to learn’ for humanities scholars (ALGOL, APL/360, BASIC, COBOL, FORTRAN, PL/I, SNAP, SNOBOL).

The most popular languages of recent years for humanities scholars are probably JavaScript, PHP, and Python. JavaScript and PHP because of their frequent use in web development, while Python is becoming more popular as a language for Natural Language Processing. This is for instance demonstrated by the many courses and summer schools addressing Python programming for humanities scholars. Examples are, the 2013 DARIAH Summer School in Goettingen or the this years Summer School in Goettingen, or ESU in Leipzig. Also the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities in Graz, where I studied DH before coming to Dublin, moved from teaching Java programming to Python. Python is certainly a much more accessible language for humanities scholars and very useful for text processing. With more and more humanities scholars using programming languages (sometimes also only as a tool for one research task) it becomes relevant to explore how these scholars with often no CS background write code and generate software. Such studies will contribute to future developments of programming languages.

Long story short, I uploaded the latest version of my Python code to GitHub, so interested people can observe how my project progressed, and some might be even interested to contribute.

 

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NLP and Python

When researching about Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Python I came across a few useful online resources. I want to share them, because some a are not so easy to find.

For a very good introduction to Computer Programming in Python are the videos lectures of the MIT course: Introduction to Computer Programming, it goes quickly to higher concepts of programming and for a total beginner it might be worth to start with an interactive introduction, something like CodeAcademy, or one of the many online tutorials, before watching the MIT course.

For beginners in NLP and Python the O’Reilly NLTK book is a very good introduction that covers both. It is freely available as an online version under here.

The MacQuarie University in Sydney offer a course in Document Processing and the Semantic Web, and they have a list of course material that is available online:
Resources and Support Materials : COMP348