Tag Archives: Digital Scholarly Editing

Technology behind The Letters of 1916 project

The Letters of 1916 project is a crowd-sourcing project and follows a very similar approach as the famous UCL Transcribe Bentham. The website is a based on a number of different technologies. A WordPress blog is used for the homepage, description and project detail pages. For the letter upload, display and transcription functionality Omeka is used with Scripto plugin and MediaWiki at the back-end. The Transcription interface is based on the DIYHistory project of the University of Iowa and uses the Transcription Toolbar from the Transcribe Bentham project. The website was developed and maintained by the team of Trinity College Dublin High Performance Computing, especially Juliusz Filipowski, Paddy Doyle and Dermot Frost, and designed by Karolina Badzmierowska, PhD candidate in the Digital Arts and Humanities at Trinity College Dublin.

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The Letters of 1916: Creating History

The Letters of 1916: Creating History is the first crowd-sourced humanities project in Ireland. The project was launched on Friday September 27th 2013 at Discover Research Night and invites people all over the world to share letters written during and related to the Easter Rising of 1916. Images of letters can be uploaded, read online and transcribed. This project focuses especially on private collections and the letters and voices of people that were less well known or even forgotten.

In the word of the principle investigator of the project Susan Schreibman, Professor of Digital Humanities NUIM:

Allowing letters from personal collections to be read alongside official letters and letters contributed by institutions will add new perspectives to the events of the period and allow us to understand what it was like to live an ordinary life through what were extraordinary times…All too often our emphasis is on the grand narrative focusing on key political figures. But as we approach the centenary of the Easter Rising we want to try to get a sense of how ordinary people coped with one of the most disruptive periods in contemporary Irish history…” press release